Edgar Cleijne & Ellen Gallagher

Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher Highway Gothic, 2017 (detail) 16 mm film installation with 70 mm film cyanotype banners Courtesy of the artists and Hauser & Wirth and Gagosian

Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher
Highway Gothic, 2017 (detail)
16 mm film installation with 70 mm film cyanotype banners
Courtesy of the artists and Hauser & Wirth and Gagosian

Edgar Cleijne

b. 1963, Eindhoven, Netherlands                                                                                                              
Resides in New York and Rotterdam, Holland. 

https://www.hauserwirth.com/

Edgar Cleijne is a Dutch artist working in photography and film. He lives in Rotterdam and New York.
Merging the opposite ends of traditional and digital imaging, Cleijne looks at the effects of our anthropocene in the crossing points of nature and culture.

Ellen Gallagher

b. 1965, Providence, RI                                                                                                               
Resides in New York and Rotterdam, Holland. 

https://www.hauserwirth.com/

Ellen Gallagher  brings together non-representational formal concerns and charged figuration in paintings, drawings, collages, and films that reveal themselves slowly, first as intricate abstractions, then later as unnerving stories. The tension sustained between minimalist abstraction and image-based narratives deriving from her use of found materials gives rise to a dynamic that posits the historical constructions of the “New Negro”—a central development of the Harlem Renaissance—with concurrent developments in modernist abstraction. In doing so, she points to the artificiality of the perceived schism between figuration and abstraction in art. Selecting from a wealth of popular ephemera—lined penmanship paper, magazine pages, journals, and advertising—as support for her paintings and drawings, Gallagher subjects the original elements and motifs to intense and laborious processes of transformation including accumulation, erasure, interruption and interference. Like forensic evidence, only traces of their original state remain, veiled by inky saturation, smudges, staining, perforations, punctures, spills, abrasions, printed lettering and marking, all potent evocations and emanations of time and its materiality. This attained state of “un–knowing” fascinates Gallagher and is one of the primary themes in her work.